Media: Where This Appetite for Scandals Comes From

Media: Where This Appetite for Scandals Comes From

By Bruce Frassinelli bfrassinelli@ptd.net ‘Do our political servants today have more scandals than their predecessors, or is it that today’s news media are more probing, and scandals and sexual indiscretions are more likely to get social media attention?’ As we head toward the presidential election finish line in November, the issue of how the news media report on campaign issues continues to dominate center stage. Critics say the media are obsessed with fringe issues, which, in some cases, result in the destruction of candidates for high public office. They point to Sen. Al Franken, D-Minnesota, and Rep. John Conyers, D-Michigan. Franken, a former stand-up comedian who was on an upward trajectory in the Democratic Party, resigned in 2017 after he was accused of sexual harassment. Conyers was the longest serving member of Congress when he retired — also because of sexual harassment allegations in 2016. When it comes to these allegations, especially among presidential candidates, some wonder what does this have to do with running the country. The question has much to do with the way the media report these missteps. The role of journalism and journalists has gone through many twists and turns when it comes to the reporting

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