Icons of My Youth Not in Tune with Post-George Floyd Era

Icons of My Youth Not in Tune with Post-George Floyd Era

By Bruce Frassinelli bfrassinelli@ptd.net ‘The three brands are the latest of a number of products and images that have come under intense scrutiny because of their unacceptable stereotypical portrayal of African Americans.’ When I was an always voraciously hungry teenager growing up, my mom would serve seemingly endless stacks of Aunt Jemima pancakes slathered with real butter and lots of Aunt Jemima syrup. (I cannot tell a lie — the mere memory is making my mouth water as I write this.) Mom would whip up four at a time on a large griddle, and the aroma would fill our kitchen, probably stimulating my already legendary appetite. “Keep ‘em coming, Ma,” I would tell her. It would not be unusual for me to consume between 16 and 20 of these heavenly delights in one sitting. What!! Give me a break — I was a growing boy. Well, along with other icons of my youth, Aunt Jemima is being condemned to the scrapheap of history, because this smiling, once rotund (now slimmed down) face on the distinctive Quaker Oats Co. box has become one of the latest politically correct victims of the recent protests, calls for police reforms and re-evaluation of our

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