The Unique Way Journalists Write

The Unique Way Journalists Write

They are accused of using arcane language that most humans do not. This newsspeak is called “journalese” By Bruce Frassinelli bfrassinelli@ptd.net ‘What about the “heist” at the local savings and loan where the perpetrator made his getaway with the “loot.” Professionals in various businesses are notorious for using words and acronyms that the public cannot understand. Public relations specialists advise their bosses when making speeches to KISS (Keep It Short and Simple). We see acronyms such as GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Practices), IPO (Initial Public Offering), NDA (Non-Disclosure Agreement) and EBITDA (Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization). “Jargon masks real meaning,” Jennifer Chatman, management professor at the University of California-Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, once said. “People use it as a substitute for thinking hard and clearly about their goals and the direction that they want to give others.” Here are just a few of the thousands of jargon-filled terms that business-oriented professionals lean on too heavily: • Think outside the box (to approach a business problem in an unconventional fashion) • Robust (a product or service with a virtually endless capacity to please) • Reach out (contact a person or company) Then, there is this one which annoys me

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